Nate Berkus, Humanity Matters By David Chronister

item14.rendition.slideshowWideVertical.nate-berkus-target-15-bookNate Berkus on Design and Life: “Design is a huge passion of mine, obviously. I think the home should rise up to greet you, but people should rise up to greet each other,” he says,” Your life should actually rise up to greet you.”
Oprah introduced us viewers to Nate Berkus in 2002, where he renovated a 319 square-foot studio apartment and turned it into an innovated multi-functioning living space with room to spare. After that he would go on to design for the Oprah show for 8 more years and engineer 127 make-overs, he did 17 bedrooms, 22 living rooms, 17 bathrooms, 16 kitchens and backyards, playrooms and assorted nursery’s.

Nate Berkus has many characterisitcs that have contributed to his success:                             #1 Entrepreneur: He launched his own design firm at the age of 22

#2 Innovative: He recites frequently that there shouldn’t be too many rules on personal style, often breaking many design norms, he finds a way to represent his clients style rather than to impose his personal taste.

#3 Risk-Taker: Despite being very successful he often takes on new and ambitious projects such as producing the film “The Help”. He also has ventured into network tv and released a product line, Calico Corners for Target and authoring his latest book on interior design, “The Things That Matter.”

While studying in Paris, Berkus bought a chain-shaped sculpture, which he dragged home and still keeps in his apartment. He’s reinterpreted it here in a bold, bright yellow. “I hope people can take a piece from the collection and think, How does this update a room?” Oversize Chain Link in gold, $13

While studying in Paris, Berkus bought a chain-shaped sculpture, which he dragged home and still keeps in his apartment. He’s reinterpreted it here in a bold, bright yellow. “I hope people can take a piece from the collection and think, How does this update a room?”
Oversize Chain Link in gold, $13

 

 

 

Fans of Berkus are familiar with his remarkable ability to create balance in a room in an interesting, easily sophisticated way. The Sculpted Branch Lamp embodies this point of view and adds a dash of brass to boot. Sculpted Branch Lamp Base, $25; Drum Shade in natural, $25.

Fans of Berkus are familiar with his remarkable ability to create balance in a room in an interesting, easily sophisticated way. The Sculpted Branch Lamp embodies this point of view and adds a dash of brass to boot.
Sculpted Branch Lamp Base, $25; Drum Shade in natural, $25.

When Berkus was growing up in suburban Minneapolis, his house always held the tortoise shell that his mother found on his parents’ honeymoon in Mexico. Later, he found a vintage version that reminded him of the one from his childhood home. My earliest tear sheets of one of his previous New York apartments show the shell amid a gallery of mostly black-and-white images against a brown wall. It shows up again in a later apartment against crisp, clean white; the shell is in his home in New York today.

When Berkus was growing up in suburban Minneapolis, his house always held the tortoise shell that his mother found on his parents’ honeymoon in Mexico. Later, he found a vintage version that reminded him of the one from his childhood home. My earliest tear sheets of one of his previous New York apartments show the shell amid a gallery of mostly black-and-white images against a brown wall. It shows up again in a later apartment against crisp, clean white; the shell is in his home in New York today.

One thing you will notice again and again is Berkus’s affinity for texture. Braided jute, herringbone, and a hint of animal skin show up in both the collection (faux animal skin for Target) and his New York apartment. Here, the dimpled surface of these brass bowls adds dimension to their graceful shape. Hammered Brass Bowls, $15 and $8, respectively.

One thing you will notice again and again is Berkus’s affinity for texture. Braided jute, herringbone, and a hint of animal skin show up in both the collection (faux animal skin for Target) and his New York apartment. Here, the dimpled surface of these brass bowls adds dimension to their graceful shape.
Hammered Brass Bowls, $15 and $8, respectively.

In an interview for Forbes he online he told Forbes collumnist Dan Schawbel about his lessons as a successful business leader: “What challenges did you have getting started with your business & how did you overcome them?”
” When you’re just starting out, I think the biggest challenge is just that.Starting out. It’d be much easier if all you had to do all day was what was on your business card but you have to spend just as much time being the billing, HR,PR and marketing departments as you do on your actuall work. It can get overwhelming but the freedom you have inyour own business is worth it.”
“What are your top three pieces of career advice?”
“Believe in yourself, even when you don’t.Trust your gut and allow yourself to delegate. Don’t get so mired down in the business management that you lose sight of what it is that you do best.”
Nate Berkus cites his biggest inspiration not from traditional interior design sources but closer family ties, his mother. Nate’s mother is an interior decorator, though he admits their design aesthetic are wildly different, her sense of scale taught him alot about interior’s. Everything in a room had a purpose to serve. Nate’s Father was equal inrpiring, being an entrepreneur & businessman, his father founded the National Sport’s collectors convention. His father was able to successfully marry a hobby to a proffession, deeply impacting Naten to pursue his own dreams.
Nate Told Oprah during a recent interview, for the release of, “The things that Matter.” He admitted that kindness and compassion matters deeply to him. The first time he was to have dinner with the 5 time Emmy award winning producer, Corrin Nelson Nate says that even when faced with her impressive reputation he looked forward to seeing how she came off in person, what she did in her free time and whether or not she would be nice to the waiter.
Nate Berkus is my favorited designer, I’ve watched all his appearances religously, his style had always been class and edgey and all his own. Like him I found my love of design by working in a department store, although he was a 16 year old who racked up debt because he had opened a line of credit, also like Nate, when I was young I obssessively rearranged my rooms and things around the house. More than the little stuff though, I like Nate as a designer for the human element he incorporates into the field. He realized from his years at the auction house that stuff is more than stuff. items carry a sense of personal history. He often encourages people to interact with their interiors. Don’t hesitate to surround yourself with nostalgia, the things you love, items that empower, that will rise up to greet you. For more Nate Berkus, his designs and projects visit: http://www.nateberkus.com/

nate-berkus-interior-design-ed0710-01nate-berkus-interior-design-ed0710-02nate-berkus-interior-design-ed0710-03cn_image.size.nate-berkus-target-article-h670

http://www.forbes.com/sites/danschawbel/2012/11/19/nate-berkus-how-he-got-into-tv-the-oprah-effect-and-his-best-advice
http://thenorthelevation.blogspot.com/2010/07/spaces-nate-berkus-adams-residence.htmlcollection-preview-slideshow_slideshow_item14_15http://www.architecturaldigest.com/shop/2012-11/nate-berkus-target-home-accessories-

 

 

 

Advertisements